Doctor Biography: Dr. Bradley Katz

Bradley Katz FL-41 neuro-ophthalmologist professor expert

Dr. Katz is a tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and holds an Adjunct appointment in the Department of Neurology. He splits his time between clinical care, surgery, research and teaching. Dr. Katz chairs the Department’s Adjunct Faculty Committee and serves in the University’s Academic Senate (admin.utah.edu/academic-senate). Dr. Katz is a Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (www.aao.org) and a Fellow of the North-American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (www.nanosweb.org).

Dr. Katz received undergraduate degrees in Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering from Northwestern University in 1986. After completing the MD/PhD program at the University of Illinois and a medical internship, he trained in ophthalmology at the University of Iowa. In 1998 he moved to Salt Lake City to become the Department’s first neuro-ophthalmology fellow. Dr. Katz joined the faculty the following year.

Along with his partners Dr. Steven Blair and Benjamin Rollins, Dr. Katz founded Axon Optics (www.axonoptics.com). Axon is developing thin-film spectacle coatings for the prevention and treatment of migraine headaches. Dr. Katz is part of an inter-departmental project at Utah to find new treatments for giant cell arteritis, a blinding disease that exclusively affects the elderly. Dr. Katz is also collaborating on a project with the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to evaluate treatments for optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis.

Dr. Katz is a native of St. Louis, Missouri. He has lived in Utah for 14 years with his wife and three children. Outside of the Moran Eye Center, Dr. Katz enjoys biking, swimming, good food and loud music.

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Benign Essential Blepharospasm, Photophobia and FL-41

Benign Essential Blepharospasm, Photophobia and FL-41: a presentation by Dr. Bradley Katz.

Dr. Katz explains the research, science, and nature of light sensitivity and blepharospasm is eas-to-understand terms.  He does not receive any payment for his research into better solutions.  Click this text to watch Dr. Katz discuss the efficacy of FL-41 glasses in treating benign essential blepharospasm!  

This video is from the 27th International Conference and Scientific Symposium of the Benign Essential Blepharospasm Research Foundation in Irvine, California on August 8, 2009.  Hosted courtesy of the non-profit  Benign Essential Blepharospasm Research Foundation (BEBRF). Learn more about their foundation at www.Blepharospasm.org.

Dr. Katz is a tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and holds an Adjunct appointment in the Department of Neurology. He splits his time between clinical care, surgery, research and teaching. Dr. Katz chairs the Department’s Adjunct Faculty Committee and serves in the University’s Academic Senate (admin.utah.edu/academic-senate). Dr. Katz is a Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (www.aao.org) and a Fellow of the North-American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (www.nanosweb.org).

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OUCH! Why do some colors HURT? Understanding the Visual Spectrum with Dr. Katz

visual spectrum fl-41 tint axon optics therapeutic  fluorescent

Understanding the Visual Spectrum with Dr. Katz

The visual spectrum, the wavelengths of light that the human eye can see, include long wavelength light (red) all the way through short wavelength light (blue). The visual spectrum includes all colors of the rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet. Red and orange have longer wavelengths and blue/indigo/violet have shorter wavelengths.

Infrared light (heat) is invisible to us because it has a wavelength longer than red, thus the name “infra-red” (literally "Below-Red"). Infrared technology is used in many technologies, including night-vision goggles, LEDs (Light-emitting diodes), and telescopes that look into outer space. Most of the heat emitted from objects is infrared.

Ultraviolet light (UV) is invisible to us because it has a shorter wavelength, thus the name “ultra-violet" (Literally "Beyond-Violet"). UV light cannot be seen, but has the potential to damage our skin and eyes. We need a small amount of UV light to help our bodies make Vitamin D. UV light is also used in inventions, including LEDs (Light-emitting diodes), forensics, fluorescent dyes, neon signs and black lights, and many more.

Why do some colors HURT? Different wavelengths affect an individual’s comfort level. Some studies have indicated that migraine sufferers experience more discomfort with blue- or red-wavelength light. We can help about 90% of people with light sensitivity (photophobia) with our proprietary blend of FL-41 tinted lenses. Axon Optics lenses filter the portion of the light spectrum which is most distressing to people with light sensitivity (photophobia) and its associated conditions. The filter is especially helpful in relieving pain from fluorescent lights, LEDs, and electronic devices – the majority of our modern world. In addition, all of our lenses block 100% UVA/UVB light for the most therapeutic possible lens. Our research continues on the causes of photophobia, both ocular and neurological.

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Multi-Use Transitions versus Indoor Eyeglasses and Outdoor Sunglasses

Axon Optics Prime s 59 Indoor and Outdoor

I am often asked: "Which is better, a single pair of Transitions lenses, or to have a Pair of Indoor Lenses and a Pair of Outdoor Lenses, respectively? It's about the same price, what should I choose?"

Let's compare the pros and cons of each option.

A single pair of Transitions: Some people would find it annoying to switch pairs over the course of the day. They'd like to have a single pair of glasses on their face, and forget about it. The pros to a single pair of transitions are the convenience and simplicity of a single pair. It may cost more or less than two pairs, depending on what you order. You're less likely to misplace a single pair.
The cons – Some people need to switch frames during the day, because the pair of glasses they'd wear in an office is much smaller than what they'd wear in the sun, and what they'd wear as sunglasses is far too bulky for the office.

An Indoor and an Outdoor Pair: The Pros to having two different pairs are the ability to change frame coverage and aesthetic style.  Our outdoor tint is more therapeutic than our indoor or transitions lenses, giving you a higher level of relief.  Again, the cost may be more or less than a single pair of transitions, depending on what is purchased; and the potential for a backup pair in case one pair is lost, stolen, or damaged.

For me personally, I prefer the latter. I find that the transitions aren't quite dark enough to replace our outdoor tint when the lights are especially bright or my photophobia is extreme. I like switching to my bigger Mistral frame in those situations, which would be too big for business meetings. I also like having a backup pair for emergencies – I've been on trips before where a lens was damaged, and I was glad to have the other pair available.

Thanks for reading.  Have a Pain-Free Day!

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A Rosy Valentine’s Day

heart wearing axon optics raybans fl-41 fluorescent light lenses

Are you currently logged into Facebook?

If so, check out how this couple spent a sweet Valentine's Day at the beach.

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Dystonia: A neurological movement disorder

Many friends and members of our Axon Optics Family suffer from Dystonia. Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder, in which sustained muscle contractions cause twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Please help us raise awareness for Dystonia by sharing this video.  Thanks!

 

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OMG OMG OMG!!!

 

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FL-41 Tinted Prescription Lenses: Can it be done?

Prescriptions are non-refundable, so I recommend one of two things first:

1. If you're sure you'll like the tint, send us a frame you've chosen so that you can be sure it will fit and provide enough coverage.
2. If you're unsure about the tint, order a few different non-prescription tints in our frames to see which is best for you, then return them within 45 days. Non-RX lenses in our frames are 100% refundable within 45 days of purchase. You should be able to tell quickly if the tint helps you, which is preferred, and if any of our frames suit you.

Got a prescription more complex than Single-Vision? Have your eye doctor contact us for uncut lenses. S/he can cut them to your prescription and frame – and bill it to your insurance, in some cases. May also be FSA Eligible!
Need authorization or a referral from your physician to get coverage?  Most physicians are glad to prescribe our tint if they understand its benefits.  We have a wealth of links to scientific studies published in the National Institute of Health's Online Library.  Click Here to read them.  

FL-41 works for most people who experience photophobia, and can help you take fewer medications.  You may even require fewer visits to a doctor, which means fewer co-pays for you (and less cost for your insurance provider!)  What have you got to lose, besides the pain?

Yala Axon Optics frame

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Video: Are Axon Optics Glasses Effective?

In This video, Dr. Bradley Katz discusses how and when Axon Optics glasses are effective. He talks about the technology and research behind this ground breaking method of treatment for mirgaines. Check out the video below:

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Video: Using Axon Optics Glasses Indoors

In this video, Dr. Bradley Katz discusses using Axon Optics glasses indoors. He discusses transition tints as well as the effectiveness of Axon Optics glasses while looking at computer screens. Check out the video below:

Check out Axon Optics Products Here.

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